The Caine Prize: Is it the foreign gatekeeper of Africa's fiction?

Author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie poses with her novel “Americanah” ahead of the 2014 Bailey’s Women’s Prize for Fiction in London June 4, 2014. She was a 2002 finalist of the Caine Prize. Photo: Neil Hall/Reuters/File

A teenage boy confronts a father wasting away from an unknown disease in a South African township in the early 1990s. A blind Nigerian girl stifles a flicker of hope that she will be healed at the hands of a Lagos mega-church preacher. An Indian South African couple tip-toe along apartheid’s racial boundaries at a gala in a white Johannesburg hotel.

These are some of the shards of modern Africa on display in the stories named Tuesday as finalists for this year’s Caine Prize, an annual short-fiction award for English language African writing. Drawn from a record 153 entries hailing from 17 countries, the five finalists are writers of diverse trajectories — from a duo of internationally acclaimed Nigerians to a South African-Australian lawyer whose nominated story is her first published work.

Read more: The Caine Prize: Is it the foreign gatekeeper of Africa's fiction? – CSMonitor.com.

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