Things Fall Apart News

The images of Igbo before: An interview with Chiadikobi Nwaubani, Founder of Ukpuru

The images of Igbo before: An interview with Chiadikobi Nwaubani, Founder of Ukpuru

Culture is always evolving and changing. Like Chimamanda Adichie said, “Culture does not make people, people make culture.”

Chinua Achebe

Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart (Audio)

In 1958, Nigerian writer, Chinua Achebe, published his first book “Things Fall Apart”. It was set in pre-colonial rural Nigeria and examines how the arrival of foreigners led to tensions within the Igbo society.

Chibundu Onuzo, Author of "The Spider King's Daughter"

What I read growing up in Lagos: Chibundu Onuzo

Growing up in Lagos, the closest library to my house was an hour’s drive away. It was a private library, moderately well stocked and tidily catalogued but you could only borrow one book at a time.

Chinua Achebe

Chinua Achebe: After Empire - An interview with The New Yorker from 2008

In a myth told by the Igbo people of Nigeria, men once decided to send a messenger to ask Chuku, the supreme god, if the dead could be permitted to come back to life.

Chinua Achebe

Chinua Achebe: An African Voice - An interview with The Atlantic from 2000

Chinua Achebe’s emergence as "the founding father of African literature … in the English language," in the words of the Harvard University philosopher K. Anthony Appiah, could very well be traced to his encounter in the early fifties with Joyce Cary’s novel Mister Johnson, set in Achebe’s native Nigeria.

Chinua Achebe. Image credit: newafricanmagazine.com

2 years later: Remembering Chinua Achebe, Nigeria's world-renowned literary icon

It has been two years since the passing of the world-renowned Nigerian literary icon and social critic, Chinua Achebe. The man of letters passed on January 21st, 2013 in a Boston hospital after a brief illness, leaving many Nigerians in shock and rattling the literary world.

Chinua Achebe

Chinua Achebe: An interview with the Paris Review

Chinua Achebe was born in Eastern Nigeria in 1930. He went to the local public schools and was among the first students to graduate from the University of Ibadan. After graduation, he worked for the Nigerian Broadcasting Corporation as a radio producer and Director of External Broadcasting, and it was during this period that he began his writing career.